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Reduce Manufacturing Complexity and Cost

09 September 2015

Can long term performance still be achieved whilst reducing manufacturing complexity and cost?

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That’s something that Clare McDermott, Wind Energy Business Development Manager for AkzoNobel Protective Coatings will be discussing at HUSUM 2015. Traditionally for atmospheric conditions, offshore wind projects have used a three coat protective coatings system that includes a zinc primer. However, have you ever thought about achieving long term performance, whilst also reducing manufacturing complexity and cost through the use of a novel epoxy coating system? If getting your coating specification right, first time, is important to you, then this presentation is right for you.

Clare will be presenting on this very subject at HUSUM 2015 on Wednesday September 16th, 11:30 – 12:15 in room 4. There will be opportunities to discuss your individual needs following this, so we’d love to see you there. Clare and other members of our power generation team will also be on hand at booth 2A17 to discuss your protective coatings requirements throughout HUSUM 2015.

You can find out more and find out how you can book an appointment at HUSUM by clicking here.

Records will tumble with new gas plant

28 July 2015

A new combined cycle power plant in Düsseldorf, Germany stands to break a number of records when it is entered into operation in 2016. AkzoNobel has been working alongside the EPC contractor and a global technology powerhouse Siemens to provide coatings and solutions to this exciting new facility.

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The German city of Düsseldorf is located on the west of the country and has the aim of becoming a climate neutral city by 2050. The city's ambitions fit nicely with the goals of the German government's energy policy which intends to aggressively drive down CO2 emissions. This plan involves phasing out nuclear power and introducing more renewable energy from wind and solar power, with the long term aim to create an energy platform based on sustainable energy sources.

Electrical infrastructure changes are required in order to make a switch to a fully renewable energy platform for the country. Gas fired flexible combined power plants like the one in Düsseldorf are the perfect fit to back up intermittent renewable sources. These plants can also be used to act as a bridging technology or intermediate step, where they can help to replace base load power provided to the grid by existing nuclear and coal plants but also to step in very quickly in case the wind is not blowing and the sun is not shining. Last but not least combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) plants are considered to be the intermediate step to renewable energy because they have higher efficiency than coal plants and produce less CO2 emissions, so providing incremental improvement towards the policy targets.

Despite the high gas prices, there are a number of examples of where new and existing gas turbine plants are helping to pave the way. One such example is Düsseldorf’s main city power facility, Lausward. The power plant site was originally designed to burn coal to generate electricity, but over time, new power blocks have been added to replace coal as the main fuel source. The latest addition to the site is a new, highly efficient power combined cycle power block called “Fortuna”, that will also supply heat. It will enable local city utility Stadwerke Düsseldorf AG to make an active contribution to both the energy policy and provide greater services and supply for their customers.

Stadtwerke Düsseldorf AG placed an order with EPC contractor Siemens to design and build the plant, and also to supply the major power plant equipment. As a world leading company with a wealth of experience, Siemens has installed one of the world’s leading gas turbines into the plant – the SGT5-8000H. By the time the plant is operational in 2016, they claim the plant will reach three new records in terms of power output, efficiency and heat extraction. It will have an overall efficiency of 85 percent. But that’s not all; the plant will be an architectural highlight. Designed by the company Kadawittfeldarchitektur, the power station chimney, the highest point of the building complex, will have a lift ascending to a viewing platform at a height of approximately 45 metres, from which visitors can peer through a glass façade, looking south across the plant and north, towards the city centre of Düsseldorf.

“We are very pleased to be chosen for this important and record breaking project” said Mario Leitsch from Siemens. “Due to the efficiency of the plant and the leading turbine, the plant will emit approximately 700,000 fewer metric tons of CO2 than the worldwide average for electricity generation plants every year. That is a CO2 saving equivalent to approximately 350,000 passenger cars, each driving 15,000 kilometres a year.” Leitsch continued, “To protect this plant from corrosion, we need to ensure only the highest quality coating products and fit for purpose systems are used and installed.”

Working in partnership with Siemens and their sub-contractors, AkzoNobel supplied high performance protective coatings for the structural steel and pipework on the plant. Thousands of litres of the high performance Interzinc, Intercure, Intergard and Interthane products were applied to steel fabricated by ZÜBLIN STAHLBAU.

AkzoNobel has operated within the coal, oil and gas thermal power industries for many years, working extensively with customers around the world to deliver protective coatings and assist with specifications, cross border co-ordination of projects and provide on-site technical support. With an extensive range of anticorrosive protection and high heat coatings, AkzoNobel also provides temporary protection for boiler pressure parts and heavy duty linings for flue gas desulphurization systems.

What is a combined cycle gas turbine plant?

A combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) plant uses a gas turbine to combust gas and set a generator into rotation to generate electricity. In a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), the waste heat from the gas combustion process turns water into steam. The steam is then passed through a steam turbine which in turn is connected to a generator to generate additional electricity.

Find out more about the Fortuna project by clicking here.

Chartek 7E - The next evolution in fire protection has arrived

03 July 2015

Our new mesh-free epoxy passive fire protection solution, Chartek 7E, is a lower applied weight coating utilizing our patented char stabilization technology.

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Chartek 7E, built upon proven Chartek 7 technology, represents a significant advancement in passive fire protection in the oil and gas industry.

Chartek 7E passive fire protection product delivers jet fire and pool fire resistance along with the unparralleled quality you come to expect from all Chartek products.

Find out more by clicking here.

Discover Chartek 8E and fire design

04 May 2015

AkzoNobel has launched a new Chartek passive fire protection coating aimed at the offshore oil and gas industry. Chartek 8E provides a significant reduction in applied weight, addressing a key customer need and resulting in a more sustainable passive fire protection offer.

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Chartek 8E, based on a proven in-service technology, is optimized to provide 60 minutes resistance to the effects of hydrocarbon pool fires without the use of mesh; a 60-minute resistance to jet fires can also be achieved through the use of mesh reinforcement.

The journey of over 40 years of unrivalled fire protection continues…

Chartek performs below zero

18 March 2015

Despite only accounting for around 6% of the Earth's surface area, the region above the Arctic Circle could account for as much as 30% of the world's undiscovered but recoverable natural gas resources.

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With such a significant opportunity for natural gas production, the Arctic region has the potential to become a major contributor to the future growth of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) sector. Add to this the increasing viability of potentially lucrative shipping routes through the Arctic seas and it is no wonder that many in the industry are looking to colder climates for the next big opportunity.

The following article published in LNG Industry magazine discusses the challenges faced in the construction of LNG facilities in such difficult environments and the importance of specifying the right passive fire protection system to withstand the harsh conditions experienced throughout the service life of the asset.

Find out more by clicking here (PDF 4MB).

A high performance coating system for the Melbourne Star Observation Wheel

12 January 2015

The Melbourne Star Observation Wheel is Melbourne, Australia’s newest tourist attraction. Standing at 120 meters (394 feet) tall, it’s the Southern Hemisphere’s only giant observation wheel. It’s seven pointed spokes representing the seven-pointed star of the Australian flag – a fitting tribute.

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Commissioned by Sanoyas Rides Corporation to Engineering house Arup, Alfasi Steel Construction in Melbourne and Haywards Steel Fabrication and Construction of Tasmania – the Melbourne Star has already received a string of accolades for its design, engineering and construction, since its official opening on December 23, 2013.

Protected with an International two coat protective coatings system consisting of Interzinc 52 primer and Interfine 979 topcoat, the Melbourne Star will continue to wow crowds for years to come. This two coat system was used instead of a conventional three coat system due to the excellent adhesion and fast curing properties the combination of Interzinc 52 and Interfine 979 offers. This helped to fast track the construction schedule without compromising the standard of corrosion protection achieved. This high performance coating system was spray applied after fabrication by painting contractors, Action Alliance of Melbourne and McElligott of Tasmania, with touch ups being carried out at the job site.

The polysiloxane Interfine 979 topcoat used was appropriately named ‘Melbourne Star Observation Wheel White’ after the original color specification, which led to high praise for AkzoNobel for our color matching abilities.

Find out more about the Melbourne Star Observation Wheel, by clicking here (PDF 313 KB).

New issue of surfaces 25 is now available

28 November 2014

The new issue of surfaces focuses on ‘movement’. The movement of people; for business and pleasure, as well as the movement of products from manufacture to end use.

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It takes a look at the new Rotterdam Centraal Station, which sees 110,000 people pass through daily.

You’ll find a 360 degree tour of Australia’s newest icon; the Melbourne Star Observation Wheel.

Malaysia is the focus in the Pengerang Independent Terminal article which upon completion, will see the movement and storage of liquid petroleum and crude products across 1.3 million cubic meters.

To view issue 25 of Surfaces magazine, click here (PDF 2 MB).

To request your printed copy of Surfaces magazine, click here

Protective Coatings Don't Have to be a Rollercoaster Ride

17 October 2014

Every year, millions of thrill-seekers from around the world visit theme parks to experience the adrenalin rush offered by roller coasters. The ever-growing popularity of white knuckle rides only increases the importance of rider safety, which is why the likes of Busch Gardens in Florida, USA, subscribed to the help and expertise of AkzoNobel and its International® protective coatings products.

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The project required one of our topcoats, Interfine 1080, which was still in the research and development stage of production. However, in order to meet the requirements of the customer, we allocated additional resources to the product to ensure that we could deliver the product to the project in time for the recoating to take place.

To read more about Sheikra, click here (PDF 740 KB).

Protecting Japan's first floating windfarm

12 September 2014

Discover why International® protective coatings products were chosen to protect Japan's Fukushima FORWARD Recovery Project.

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To read more about Japan's first floating windfarm, click here (PDF 616 KB).

More than just chemical and abrasion resistance

16 August 2014

Discover how our coatings are being used on an all new mining complex

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Discover why International® protective coatings products were chosen to coat elements of Turkmenistan's new Garlyk mining and processing complex.

To read more about chemical and abrasion resistance, click here (PDF 715 KB).

Mong Dong II linked up to national electric grid

16 July 2014

The end of June 2014 saw Mong Duong II, soon to be Vietnam’s largest coal power station, complete a significant milestone in the synchronization of the gross 620 MW first unit of the project to the 500 kV electric grid.

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Coated with both protective coatings and passive fire protection products from our International® range, Mong Duong II is located in Vietnam’s Quang Ninh province and financed, in the majority, by the US independent power producer AES, who own a 51% equity in the project. Korean firm Doosan Heavy Industries is the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor, responsible for designing, building, and commissioning the project. Upon completion of the project and following its commission in 2015, the plant will supply electricity for 2.25 million households throughout Vietnam*, with forecasted production of over 7.6 billion kWh of electricity annually**.

We have supplied a number of our International® products to the Mong Duong II project. These anticorrosive systems include Interzinc 22, Intergard 475HS and Interthane polyurethane. For passive fire protection, Chartek 1709 was used. Not only does it provide corrosion protection and fire protection in a single system, but it has a greatly reduced thickness and lower installed weight compared to many other passive fire protection systems.

To hear more about AkzoNobel’s solutions for thermal power projects, please contact your local representative.

To read more about Mong Duong II, click here (PDF 627 KB).

To contact your local sales representative, click here

*  doosan.com

** vietnambreakingnews.com

New issue of surfaces 24 is now available

15 July 2014

In this issue of surfaces magazine, we travel all over the world, as we take a look at a range of projects from Japan to Scotland, UK.

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See how we’ve been involved in the Fukushima FORWARD wind project in the wake of the devastating earthquake and tsunami that hit the area in 2011

Discover how we’ve helped to protect two 30 metre (100ft) steel horse heads in Scotland, UK

Find out how more than just chemical and abrasion resistance is being provided to a mining project in Turkmenistan

To view issue 24 of Surfaces magazine, click here (PDF 1200 KB).

To request your printed copy of Surfaces magazine, click here

Find Out How Our Protective Coatings Are Impressing the Crowds

9 July 2014

One of the most talked-about examples of structural art to be erected in the UK has been coated with protective coatings from our International® range. The Kelpies, two 30-metre (100ft) horse heads, fabricated and assembled by SH Structures, form the centrepiece of The Helix in Falkirk, Scotland. For acclaimed local sculptor Andy Scott, accustomed to sculpting his creations by hand, the two Kelpie steel structures required a somewhat different approach. Due to their sheer size, weight and resulting complexity, the engineering and construction was treated more like that of a bridge or building structure than that of a work of art.

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After all initial tenders were over the available budget, a value-engineered scheme from SH Structures, the specialists in design, supply and manufacture of complex steel structures, was chosen and the company was named principal contractor.

SH Structure’s design was based on a complex but efficient tubular steel frame to create the internal structure. The fabrication process took place in SH Structure’s facility in the UK, where the two heads were gradually built up into large sub-assemblies before being transported by road for the application of the protective coating system at specialist applicator Jack Tighe Ltd.

“We’ve had a long-standing working relationship with AkzoNobel and using the International® range, so the company was an obvious choice to assist in the selection of a suitable system for this prestigious project,’’ said Tim Burton, Sales and Marketing Manager of SH Structures.

“After understanding what the project entailed, we knew a coating was required that had good abrasion resistance and excellent aesthetic qualities; Interfine 979 fit the bill perfectly,” said Ian Baldry, UK Business Development for AkzoNobel’s Protective Coatings business. The pieces of steel, coated with the International® Interfine 979 polysiloxane finish coat, were transported to The Helix Project in no fewer than 100 individual deliveries.

Onsite assembly of both steel Kelpie structures took 90 days to complete, and The Kelpies were officially opened on April 21, 2014. Part of the visitor experience is a guided tour which tells the story behind the project and takes visitors inside one of the heads where they can clearly see the complex internal steelwork protected with AkzoNobel’s protective coatings.

To view the article in issue 24 of Surfaces magazine, click here (PDF 177 KB).

How Material and Coating Selection Impacts the Whole Lifecycle of Tall Buildings

June 2014

Material and coating selection in the architectural and high value infrastructure industry is big business. Specifying the right coating is vital in ensuring the long life of an asset. An article recently published by PCE International Magazine, written by AkzoNobel’s SBU Protective Coatings Director, Ian Walker looks into the reasons why coating specification is so important in the area of tall buildings.

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The article touches on five key areas including protection, durability and sustainability, and looks into new innovations across the whole coatings portfolio; from decorative, to protective to functional.

Fire protection selection is also addressed in this piece, with Walker highlighting the importance of modern passive fire protection products being used, resulting in a quality aesthetic finish.

New innovations from self-healing coatings to coatings that mitigate the effects of extreme weather are also addressed in this article on the selection of materials, coatings and their evolution over time.

To view the article, click here (PDF 50 KB).

New issue of surfaces 23 is now available

December, 2013

In this issue of surfaces magazine, we travel far and wide as we take a look at a range of projects from Australia to Sweden.

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Surfaces 23

See how our Chartek® passive fire protection has been used on a chemical plant for 10 years.

Discover how Korean shipyards are experiencing a newbuilding boom for offshore drill ships

Find out how we are helping a Chinese local water authority to cut the cost of its concrete protection

To read these, and a range of other articles in Surfaces issue 23, click here.

To request your printed copy of Surfaces magazine, click here

Cooled Conservatories at Gardens by the Bay

July 19 2013

Sitting peacefully on the shores of Singapore’s Marina Bay, stands two of the world’s largest climate controlled glass houses, rising to almost 60 metres (197 feet) and covering almost 20,000m² (215,279ft²) between them.

Cooled Conservatories at Gardens by the Bay

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Forming only one part of Singapore’s award winning Gardens by the Bay attraction, the enclosed conservatories play host to two ecosystems in the form of a 1.2 hectare (3.17 acre) ‘Flower Dome’; a cool dry conservatory telling the story of plants from the Mediterranean and semi-arid subtropical regions of the world, and a 0.8 hectare (1.81 acre) ‘Cloud Forest’, a cool moist conservatory showcasing plants from the Tropical Montane environments.

The conservatories’ glass and steel design was driven by the need to maximize daylight and sustainability, it was also designed to support its own weight and the weight of the glass. The result is two curved gridshells with column-free spans to allow in maximum light, supported by giant steel arches. International Paint’s high performance protective coatings were used to protect the steel arches from the effects of corrosion, to which a system of Interzinc® 52, Intergard® 475 and Interthane® 990 was chosen. The same system was also used on the 18 “Supertree” structures that stand tall within the gardens, ranging from 25 metres (82 feet) in height to 50 metres (164 feet). The Supertrees are home to exotic plants and are fitted with environmental technologies that mimic the ecological function of trees.

The Supertrees are home to exotic plants and are fitted with environmental technologies that mimic the ecological function of trees. The Supertrees also provide air intake and exhaust functions as part of the conservatories’ cooling systems. Across both the conservatories and Supertrees, 50,000 litres (10,999 gallons) of International Paint protective coatings were applied. On the application, Alvin Yeo, Sales Manager for International Paint in Singapore said “it was vital that a high quality finish was delivered for both the conservatories and the Supertrees.”

International Paint worked with main contractors Woh Hup Pte Ltd, along with fabricators YongNam Engineering (for the conservatories) and TTJ Design & Engineering (for the Supertrees), to deliver the exact ?nish necessary for the structures.

To read the full article, and a range of other articles in Surfaces issue 22, click here.

To find out more about our Infrastructure Market Offer, click here

Protecting Antarctic Research Base From Fire

July 12 2013

Innovative engineering that stretches the imagination, revolutionary design that resembles something out of a Sci-Fi movie and advanced coatings solutions not usually associated with such southern settings.

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Since 1957, when the Royal Society Antarctic expedition established a base on the Brunt Ice Shelf, British stations have been located there and named the British Astronomer Edmund Halley, of Halley’s Comet fame. The Brunt Ice Shelf is an important location where Scientists and Technologists alike, assemble to observe the Earth’s magnetic field and near-space atmosphere. The Brunt itself is a 150 metre (492 feet) thick floating ice shelf, which in terms of height, would stand taller than the London Eye, which stands at 135 metres (443 feet). Whilst it is connected to land and ice, the Brunt Ice Shelf ‘flows’ North West at an approximate rate of 400 metres (1,312 feet) annually. This movement has previously resulted in the first four British Antarctic Survey (BAS) stations being lost to the elements.

In June 2004, the BAS teamed up with the Royal Institute of British Architects to announce an international competition for the design of Halley Vl. From a total of 86 entries, and a series of three finalists, a winner was chosen; Hugh Broughton Architects and AECOM multidisciplinary engineers were named winners of the €30 million contract in October 2005.

Intumescent Fire Protection

While in Cape Town, structural elements of the pods were coated with Interchar® 212, our intumescent fire protection coating. “Apart from the obvious challenges posed by Antarctica’s extremely hostile climate, with no naturally occurring liquid water to hand, fire is a very real hazard,” explained David Kinniburgh, Fire Protection Business Development Manager. “When you’re out on the Brunt Ice Shelf and there’s an emergency, there’s nobody to call,” he said.

Fire protection in Antarctica is essential for buildings — even those in sub-zero climates. “That’s why we were asked to supply Interchar 212, a coating which was appropriate enough to be ‘self-selecting,’ which simply means that nothing else will do. It is corrosion resistant, maintenance-free, will easily survive the Antarctic temperatures, you can drag it over the ice without damage and, in the event of fire, it undergoes a chemical change so that its intumescent properties insulate and protect the structural steel from collapse. In the case of Halley Vl, it would give the crew sufficient time to don protective clothing and escape onto the ice” Kinniburgh added.

The revolutionary design comprises a total of 26 pods installed in eight modules that provide fully-serviced accommodation for up to 52 scientists and technicians during the summer and at least 16 during the hostile Antarctic winter. The modules were built in Cape Town, South Africa, and the first sections were shipped to Antarctica in December 2007. They were then assembled alongside Halley V and hauled 15 kilometers before being reconnected.

Surfaces 22 - out now

June 7 2013

In this issue of surfaces magazine, we focus on 'extremes'. With extreme savings, extreme heights and extreme conditions being just some of the themes that we take a look at.

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  • Extreme heights are tackled in an article on China's, soon to be, tallest building.
  • Discover how a supply agreement with one of the world's biggest players in the wind power industry has seen extreme reductions in Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) levels.
  • Find out about recent developments in Corrosion Under Insulation (CUI) testing methods.

To read these, and a range of other articles in Surfaces issue 22, click here.

To request your printed copy of Surfaces magazine, click here

Calling for Wider Usage of Eurocodes

March 5 2013

A London Parliamentary seminar, taken by International Paint's Peter Scott, calls for wider adoption of Eurocodes in the architectural market.

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Research into Corrosion Under Insulation Reaps Rewards

The Society for Protective Coatings (SSPC) recently awarded International Paint's Mike O'Donoghue, Vijay Datta, Adrian Andrews and Sean Adlem, as well as other contributors, the SSPC Outstanding Publications Award for their technical paper "When Under Cover Agents Can't Stand the Heat: Coatings in Action and the Netherworld of Corrosion Under Insulation."

The award-winning paper was shortlisted from more than 100 contenders and ultimately granted the award based upon clarity of expression, originality of content and importance to the protective coatings industry.

O'Donoghue, Datta, Andrews and Adlem, alongside co-authors Matt Giardina, formerly of International Paint; Nicole de Varennes, Linda G.S. Gray and Damien Lachat of RAE Engineering and Inspection Ltd.; and Bill Johnson of Acuren Group also worked on the paper, which was published in February 2012.

The article presented the results of a detailed laboratory examination of the claims of commercially available products that have been specially developed to mitigate corrosion under insulation (CUI).

The comprehensive assessment included a review of four coatings technologies, offering extensive analysis and evaluation of performance over an extended accelerated CUI test cycle. The aim was to identify promising new pipe and process vessel coatings that could be used in cyclic, rather than continuous-temperature CUI environments.

O'Donoghue, Datta, and Andrews were presented with their awards on the 14th January at the 2013 SSPC conference held in San Antonio, Texas. The award marks the fifth collaborative work between O'Donoghue and Datta to receive the prestigious SSPC Outstanding Publications Award. During 2012, O'Donoghue was also named as one of 24 recipients of JPCL's 2012 Top Thinkers: The Clive Hare Honours, which is awarded for significant contributions to the protective coatings industry over the last 10 years.

Also, the second instalment in the two-part series "When Undercover Agents are Tested to the Limit: Coatings in Action and Corrosion Under Insulation at High Temperatures" was awarded the 'Technical Education Selection for the President's Lecture Series Award.' This was a successful collaboration between the four International Paint contributors; along with Linda G. S. Gray, Tara Chahl and Nicole de Varennes from RAE Engineering and Inspection Ltd.; and Bill Johnson of Acuren Group Inc.

Research into Corrosion Under Insulation Reaps Rewards

March 1 2013

The Society for Protective Coatings (SSPC) recently awarded International Paint's Mike O'Donoghue, Vijay Datta, Adrian Andrews and Sean Adlem, as well as other contributors, the SSPC Outstanding Publications Award for their technical paper.

Read More

Research into Corrosion Under Insulation Reaps Rewards

The Society for Protective Coatings (SSPC) recently awarded International Paint's Mike O'Donoghue, Vijay Datta, Adrian Andrews and Sean Adlem, as well as other contributors, the SSPC Outstanding Publications Award for their technical paper "When Under Cover Agents Can't Stand the Heat: Coatings in Action and the Netherworld of Corrosion Under Insulation."

The award-winning paper was shortlisted from more than 100 contenders and ultimately granted the award based upon clarity of expression, originality of content and importance to the protective coatings industry.

O'Donoghue, Datta, Andrews and Adlem, alongside co-authors Matt Giardina, formerly of International Paint; Nicole de Varennes, Linda G.S. Gray and Damien Lachat of RAE Engineering and Inspection Ltd.; and Bill Johnson of Acuren Group also worked on the paper, which was published in February 2012.

The article presented the results of a detailed laboratory examination of the claims of commercially available products that have been specially developed to mitigate corrosion under insulation (CUI).

The comprehensive assessment included a review of four coatings technologies, offering extensive analysis and evaluation of performance over an extended accelerated CUI test cycle. The aim was to identify promising new pipe and process vessel coatings that could be used in cyclic, rather than continuous-temperature CUI environments.

O'Donoghue, Datta, and Andrews were presented with their awards on the 14th January at the 2013 SSPC conference held in San Antonio, Texas. The award marks the fifth collaborative work between O'Donoghue and Datta to receive the prestigious SSPC Outstanding Publications Award. During 2012, O'Donoghue was also named as one of 24 recipients of JPCL's 2012 Top Thinkers: The Clive Hare Honours, which is awarded for significant contributions to the protective coatings industry over the last 10 years.

Also, the second instalment in the two-part series "When Undercover Agents are Tested to the Limit: Coatings in Action and Corrosion Under Insulation at High Temperatures" was awarded the 'Technical Education Selection for the President's Lecture Series Award.' This was a successful collaboration between the four International Paint contributors; along with Linda G. S. Gray, Tara Chahl and Nicole de Varennes from RAE Engineering and Inspection Ltd.; and Bill Johnson of Acuren Group Inc.

The Wuxi Grand Theatre

January 7 2013

Wuxi Grand Theatre

The Wuxi Grand Theatre in China is an architectural marvel, utilising International Paint's striking metallic Interthane® 990 finish. Find out more here.

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The Wuxi Grand Theatre

Issue 21 of Surfaces magazine has reported on International Paint's involvement with the 70,000m² (753,474ft²) theatre on the banks of the Lihu Lake in Wuxi, China.

The Wuxi Grand Theatre, which is home to the region's newest performing arts centre, is made up of a performance hall, seating 1,700 alongside a second multi-functional hall with a further capacity of 700.

The grand design of the exterior of the theatre lends itself well to the minimalist yet cutting edge interior. To compliment such a cutting edge project, which pushed so many design boundaries, including the roof which is constructed using eight large wing-shaped structures, a trusted and proven coatings provider was needed. This was found in International Paint, who supplied Interthane® 990 Metallic for the exterior facets of the theatre.

The level of technical support that International Paint brings to a project is regarded within the industry, which is one of the many reasons the fabricators involved in the project, were so keen to work with us.

Click below to read more about this exciting project and why those involved chose International Paint as coatings partner.

The Success of Glass Flake Epoxies

November 28 2012

Hutton TLP

Dr Toby Stein of International Paint disccusses why epoxy glass flake technology has been used in the offshore industry for over 30 years in this month's PCE Magazine

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The Success of Glass Flake Epoxies

Epoxy glass flake technology has been used in the offshore industry for over 30 years to protect the splash zone of offshore assets and heavy duty areas including heli-decks Dr Toby Stein, from International Paint, explains why.

Epoxy glass flake technology rapidly grew favour during the North Sea oil boom in the 1980s encouraged by UK yards, which saw the ease of application compared to other technologies. At the time they had to apply low solids coatings. By switching to high solids glass flake epoxies, productivity was increased as fewer coats were needed. Oil majors also began to see the performance benefits of choosing epoxy glass flake coatings. Today many projects still rely on such products for corrosion protection. Epoxy glass flake coatings can deliver outstanding performance, which is well documented. Recent inspections of offshore assets demonstrate the excellent long term performance of this coating technology.

Epoxy glass flake coatings have been extensively tested to offshore standards including Norsok M-501 System 7A and 7B, and perform very well against them. The inspection of the now decommissioned Hutton TLP demonstrates a good correlation between performance in the Norsok M-501 tests and what is seen in the field. "It is clear after almost 30 years offshore, the glass flake epoxy selected on the Hutton TLP is still performing very well," says Chris Jordan (former Coatings Manager for ConocoPhillips, Hutton TLP)

The particular epoxy glass flake used for the Hutton TLP possesses unique features and is still widely used today. It is a high solids epoxy with the addition of >30% lamellar glass flake present within the dry film. Not only does this type of formulation clearly provide outstanding corrosion protection but it also boasts benefits for yards too, who are responsible for applying such coatings.

The fabrication yards favour application of glass flake epoxies, such as that used on the Hutton TLP, as they give excellent resistance to damage during construction. This was a key reason for glass flake epoxy selection on the Hutton TLP. Glass flake epoxies such as this have damage and abrasion resistance, which enable heavy lift equipment to be used during construction, with minimal repairs to the coating afterwards. In addition, the high build of the coating minimises the damage that penetrates to steel. This in turn speeds up any repairs and helps sustain high productivity levels. The epoxy technology also provides easy application and a good over coating window for multiple coats or the use of other topcoats or foul release coatings. All of these factors are reasons why yards still favour glass flake epoxies such as that applied to the Hutton TLP.

Glass flake epoxy differences

Selecting a glass flake epoxy can be confusing with such an apparent large choice available in the market. Broadly speaking these can be categorised into those with low levels of glass flake and those with high levels present in the dry film. It is the high level glass flake coatings
with a high aspect ratio (or lamellar glass flake) which are used for long term protection. The purpose of the glass flake is to add to the mean path distance of ion migration through the dry film. So the higher the aspect ratio, the greater the ion migration distance is through the coating. Thus it is clear that an optimum level of high aspect ratio glass flake is required to afford ultimate anticorrosion levels of performance. At too low a level, the anti corrosion properties will be diminished and at too high a level of glass flake, the coating will become brittle. Examples of offshore assets protected with this technology, are numerous, (table 1).

Year Owner Project Platform Type
1979 ConocoPhillips Murchison Offshore platform
1983 ConocoPhillips Hutton TLP
1985 Marathon Brae 'B' Offshore platform
1989 BP Arbroath Offshore platform
1993 BP Amethyst Offshore platform
1995 Perenco Trent & Tyne Offshore platform
2000 BP Lomond Offshore platform
2007 Statoil Gjoa Semisubmersible
2010 Statoil Valemon Offshore platform
2012 ConocoPhillips Jasmine Offshore platform

Table 1 – Glass flake epoxy coatings with high levels of lamellar glass flake in their dry film have proved very popular for splash zone protection in the North Sea.

Splash Zone Protection

Glass flake epoxy coatings are most commonly used to protect splash zone areas of offshore assets. This area is subjected to the highest rates of corrosion due to its alternating wet and dry atmosphere (figure 1). In addition, splash zones and heavy duty decks also experience high impact and abrasion which can easily wear, penetrate or rupture a coating that does not contain glass flake.

Steel Loss in Splashzone  

Figure 1 – Steel loss on offshore assets is at its greatest in the splash zone area.

performance testing support

With so many glass flake coatings on offer, it's often unclear how to choose between them. In some instances, people turn to Norsok M-501 (based on ISO20340) for guidance, which under system 7A, uses a set of prequalified tests specifically for splash zone areas and system 4, which is for heavy duty decks. Norsok M-501 does not offer a coatings lifetime performance guarantee; it merely provides a performance standard. Thus, whilst glass flake coatings may pass this standard, it is also useful to turn to in-service performance before making a coating selection. The 30 year in service track record of International Paint's InterzoneTM 1000, as applied to the Hutton TLP, is a perfect example of a coating meeting the requirements of Norsok M-501 and of proven performance in the field.

Norsok M-501 testing induces stress in a coating. This helps us to understand whether the coating's properties are likely to change during its service lifetime. Therefore, we should look for coatings which show little change in internal stress or show a good resistance to 'ageing' (see graph 1).

Glass Flake Internal Stress  

Graph 1 – Internal stress graph of Interzone 1000 compared to other glass flake epoxy coatings

Poorly formulated fast cure, high solids epoxies may lead to in-service cracking. This can often be attributed to the quick curing mechanism that leads to solvent entrapment which can over time, result in coating shrinkage. Slower curing epoxies allow the solvent to escape. This reduces the chance of solvent getting trapped in the dense epoxy amine network needed for long term corrosion protection.

type and level of Glass flake

A coating will always require careful formulation to ensure it meets high end performance needs. Coating manufacturers have two options available to them in formulating epoxies with glass flake:

1) Add glass flake to increase the coating's performance
2) Add glass flake to ensure the coating meets the requirements of a specification phrase such as "glass flake epoxy".

There is a big difference between the two options. Screening of commercial glass flake epoxies can reveal a 30% variance in the levels of glass flake present within the dry film.

To meet both of the options listed above, coatings manufacturers may choose between different types of glass. For instance, lamellar glass flake will add a long "tortuous" path for ions and for water to migrate through the dry film (see figure 2) providing an excellent barrier. It is important to realise that a high aspect ratio lamellar glass flake is expensive, as the material itself is costly. Alternative glass flake epoxies can use micronized glass, but this may not significantly improve anticorrosion performance. Micronized glass flake has a low aspect ratio and this is why such coatings perform poorly in comparison to some lamellar glass flakes such as that on the Hutton TLP.

Glass Flake  

Figure 2 – For the best anticorrosive performance lamellar glass flake is required with a high aspect ratio

surface preparation

It is well known that the level of surface preparation undertaken prior to the application of a coating can have a profound impact on the coating's lifetime. Therefore, it is always recommended that carbon steel is prepared to a Sa2.5 level of cleanliness with an angular surface profile of 50-75 microns. This allows a good mechanical lock to take place between the steel substrate and the newly applied coating. The same is true of glass flake epoxies: maximum performance is achieved from a Sa2.5 surface preparation with an angular profile. If this surface preparation level cannot be achieved then coating lifetime will be reduced.

coating performance

In summary, it is no surprise the glass flake epoxy on the Hutton TLP has performed so well after almost 30 years. It is high build with a high level of lamellar glass flake in the dry film (>30%) that provides excellent damage and corrosion resistance. This makes it ideal for both use in heavy duty yards where coating impact is common and for long term anti corrosion performance. It is no wonder coatings such as International Paint's Interzone 1000 still prove popular today and are sure to do so for many years to come.

Specifying Passive Fire Protection

September 5 2012

Ian Fletcher of International Paint discusses key specification requirements for passive fire protection in the latest edition of PCE Magazine.

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Specifying Passive Fire Protection

ian fletcher of InternatIonal PaInt ltd descrIbes the two key standards that ePoxy PfP should fully comPly wIth: norsok m501 rev 5 system 5a and Iso22899-1.

Over the past decades, from real life an anti-corrosive system it is important that it experience of passive fire protection (PFP) on offshore and onshore installations, it has been clearly demonstrated that there can be significant differences in performance and life expectancy of various epoxy materials. In worst cases degradation of materials has required costly and time consuming rectification of failing products.

Owners and engineers should take care when specifying epoxy PFP for use in the oil and gas industry to ensure that products used have clear qualification to all elements of the most demanding standards applicable.

Excellent corrosion protection

Given that for most of its life epoxy PFP acts as an anti-corrosive system it is important that it has excellent durability and corrosion protection properties.

The most accepted accelerated corrosion test standard in the oil and gas industry is ISO20340 "Performance requirements for protective paint systems for offshore and related structures" because it most closely reflects the cyclic wet/ dry weather environments faced by coatings in the oil and gas onshore and offshore markets. Furthermore, the ISO20340 test method also shows similar coating breakdown mechanisms to those observed in the field.

The ISO20340 standard is used by NORSOK M501 Rev 5 System 5A to pre-qualify passive fire protection systems. The standard assesses epoxy PFP systems after exposure to 25 weeks of QUV/condensation, continuous salt spray and -20oC freeze cycles.

The System 5A pre-qualification requirements recognize that in the real world top coats may not always be present on epoxy PFP and so cannot be relied on to ensure that the epoxy PFP coating system remains mechanically robust and able to provide both optimum corrosion protection and fire performance. For this reason the standard expects the epoxy PFP coating system to pass System 5A without a topcoat. This means that the epoxy PFP coating system must demonstrate mechanical integrity by having a pull off value greater than 3MPa and a corrosion creep value less than 3mm when using a zinc primer. Epoxy PFP materials with a high retained pull off value tend to correlate well with products having a low water absorption and high hardness retention whereas the reverse is the case if water absorption is high.

Critically, it is also important that the epoxy PFP systems maintain their fire performance after weathering. The industry accepts that if after weathering the steel temperature is higher than the original design critical core temperature (typically 400oC) by a value of 10% or less when exposed to a hydrocarbon fire then an acceptable insulation is maintained for structural stability.

new standard

Until recently, epoxy PFP assessment for jet fires was inconsistent, done on an ad hoc assessment basis using various technical reports and test set- ups.

With the introduction of the first and only internationally recognized jet fire standard ISO22899-1 and the accompanying ISO TR22899- 2, the oil and gas industry now has a formal procedure to accurately assess and reliably rate epoxy PFP jet fire performance.

ISO22899 is also the only jet fire standard for which classification societies (currently giving type approvals for passive fire protection) will give type approval certificates (TACs). The type approval brings greater quality control using audit testing and factory production control assessments which were not required in previous technical reports.

The ISOTR22899-2 standard gives guidance on how to assess epoxy PFP jet fire resistance at different temperatures and assessment of the data may show lower critical core temperatures require more protection for the same jet fire duration.

The type approval should state the critical core temperature for which the TAC is valid so that it is clear under what conditions the thicknesses have been determined. This is the only way to ensure that specifications are correct for the required jet fire duration.

In summary therefore it is only by ensuring that products meet all elements of these test standards, particularly fire performance after NORSOK cycle exposure, that selection of proven and durable fire protection can be made.

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